Eq 60 cycle hum

# Import group into the FIM Portal
$newGroup | Import-FIMConfig -uri $URI
write-host “`nGroup creation request complete`n”
}
}
#———————————————————————————————————-
trap
{
$exMessage = $_.
if($(“L:”))
{write-host “`n” $(2) “`n” -foregroundcolor white -backgroundcolor darkblue}
else {write-host “`nError: ” $exMessage “`n” -foregroundcolor white -backgroundcolor darkred}
Exit
}
#———————————————————————————————————-

Big thanks to PS dot com reader E. Lorden.  E. lives in Australia and has provided us with extensive schematics and technical data on AWA broadcast-audio equipment.  AWA was the ‘RCA’ of Australia throughout much of the 20th century: they made and marketed both consumer and professional electronics equipment as well as engaging in actual broadcasting.  Due to a very protective import-taxation scheme in place in Australia until the early 1970s (as well as the high cost of shipping imported goods to that country), AWA was highly incentivized to develop its own unique line of broadcast audio equipment for the Australian market.  I have personally never seen any of these items myself, and many of the circuits are different than any US broadcast audio components that I am aware of; perhaps there is more of a Telefunken heritage to this kit.  Or perhaps it’s genuinely just unique.  Anyhow, plenty to dig into… limiters, mic preamps, power amps, etc…  Although the document is dated 1967, the circuits covered extend well back to the 1940s, judging by the types of ‘valves’ employed.

[I didn’t do anything my self… I’m all thumbs when it comes to these things. I know what I want but don’t have the patience to do it :) The copper foil is adhesive. The wires are standard cloth. The pickups wiring is standard for the Fender CS69s (you can find a schematic on the Fender site) and reverse for the bridge Duncan SSL5 as required. There’s ground wires from the pots and back claw to the copper foil. Doesn’t really matter how you do it as long as there’s a couple of connections to ground. No idea on the caps… Sorry. No baseplate. – Bjorn]

The EMF of a transformer at a given flux density increases with frequency. [17] By operating at higher frequencies, transformers can be physically more compact because a given core is able to transfer more power without reaching saturation and fewer turns are needed to achieve the same impedance. However, properties such as core loss and conductor skin effect also increase with frequency. Aircraft and military equipment employ 400 Hz power supplies which reduce core and winding weight. [34] Conversely, frequencies used for some railway electrification systems were much lower (.  Hz and 25 Hz) than normal utility frequencies (50–60 Hz) for historical reasons concerned mainly with the limitations of early electric traction motors . Consequently, the transformers used to step-down the high overhead line voltages (. 15 kV) were much larger and heavier for the same power rating than those required for the higher frequencies.

Eq 60 cycle hum

eq 60 cycle hum

The EMF of a transformer at a given flux density increases with frequency. [17] By operating at higher frequencies, transformers can be physically more compact because a given core is able to transfer more power without reaching saturation and fewer turns are needed to achieve the same impedance. However, properties such as core loss and conductor skin effect also increase with frequency. Aircraft and military equipment employ 400 Hz power supplies which reduce core and winding weight. [34] Conversely, frequencies used for some railway electrification systems were much lower (.  Hz and 25 Hz) than normal utility frequencies (50–60 Hz) for historical reasons concerned mainly with the limitations of early electric traction motors . Consequently, the transformers used to step-down the high overhead line voltages (. 15 kV) were much larger and heavier for the same power rating than those required for the higher frequencies.

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eq 60 cycle humeq 60 cycle humeq 60 cycle humeq 60 cycle humeq 60 cycle hum

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